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COLOR SYNC AND PRINTING


When doing tests of monitors, printers and papers, you can certainly find out some interesting information regarding these and the colors that are able to be reproduced. All Mac computers come with a tool that allows for easy testing of color calibration. For a PC, downloads such as Winaero ColorSync for Windows 8 and 8.1 and a few others can be found by doing some searching.

Below is a graph from the ColorSync Utility which comes with the Mac showing the range of colors for both the monitor and the printer / paper combo I've been using. I have the Canon Pro9000 Mark II printer and by looking at the profiles for all of their paper what I've been using has the best range.


Profile with Canon Glossy Paper


The larger part of the graphic with no color is the range of colors the monitor reproduces while the color shaded area is what both the monitor shows and paper will print. The bright colored area is what the paper will do the monitor does not show.

As you can see, there are a lot of greens, reds and oranges the printer / paper can't produce that is seen on the monitor, which is a bit frustrating. When looking at this, I was able to understand why I wasn't able to get the color of some wildflower fields with a lot of painbrush in them to pop with the color shown on the screen.

Also, because of the inability to print some of the colors, one image I wanted to do a print of but couldn't was the one below. When doing this print, I was getting a lot of banding across the sky. When you have this much of the same color that doesn't reproduce as well, it will result in banding.



The larger part of the graphic with no color is the range of colors the monitor reproduces while the color shaded area is what both the monitor and paper will print. The bright colored area is what the paper will do that the monitor does not show.


Profile with Red River Paper

The above profile is a comparison of the monitor with the Pro Satin for the printer from Red River Paper. It shows a much better gamut and there are even some greens and blues as well as a little gold that shows up better than what the monitor shows. There is still a bit of loss with some reds, oranges and some blues, but overall it produces a wider range of colors. As you can see, there is a lot less area where the grid is not blank. I haven't gotten any of this paper yet to do some printing but will do so shortly, but from what I see it looks like it should do a better job. They also have a gloss and a metalic paper that might be interesting to do some printing on as well.